Category «Weaponry & Munitions»

Eighteenth Century Bomb Ketch by Harry Schenawolf

Bomb Ketch, galiote a bombe, or simply Bomb, were men-of-war sailing vessels that were in use for approximately 150 years (circa 1680 – 1835). The main armament was not cannon and therefore they did not take their place in line of battle during major sea battles. Their design, the brainchild of mathematician and Inspector General …

Flintlock Lighters by Harry Schenawolf

How did they light all those candles before matches? Mankind discovered the amazing qualities of flint long before written history. The introduction of steel to what became known as the tinder box brought ready flame for quick use. People became adept at sparking dried tinder to start fires, but ingenuity lead to quicker and more …

Cannon Carriages by Harry Schenawolf

From the earliest settlements in New England and Virginia, the British Government encouraged the colonists to incorporate into tight knit communities. All supplies and necessities of life were to be provided by King and country in exchange for raw materials harvested and mined from this rich new land. This arrangement was not driven by a …

Rifles in the Revolutionary War

At the Battle of Saratoga, wilderness settler and rifleman, Tim Murphy, was ordered specifically by Benedict Arnold to target an officer vigorously directing and supporting troops.  Spotting General Simon Fraser of the Twenty-fourth Foot, Murphy mortally wounded Fraser at three hundred yards in an incredible display of marksmanship in a day when the average musket …

War Cannon in the Revolution

Revolutionary war period cannon used by all armies was the standard smooth-bore muzzle-loading weapon that had not changed its design in the previous two hundred years and would go on to remain very much the same for another hundred years. Cast in iron or bronze, a cannon was loaded with prepared cartridge of paper or …

Gunpowder and its Supply in the American Revolutionary War

The supply of gunpowder haunted George Washington and the Continental Congress throughout the entire Revolutionary War.  The vast quantity of powder came from sources overseas , around 90% from French Colonies in the West Indies. The other 10% was produced domestically. With dwindling powder supplies and only three powder mills in operation in all of …