Category «Organization»

Washington’s Staff: Adjunct General

In Washington’s army, the role of Adjunct General was to keep all records. All of Washington’s orders were sent though the Adjunct and within the Adjunct’s department, they were registered, made official, and handwritten copies were made. He received multiple general instructions from Washington on a daily basis, whereupon he issued the necessary orders to …

Washington’s Staff: Major General of the Day

The Continental Army of 1776 did not have a chief of staff, one officer charged with making the commander’s requests known. In Washington’s army, one of the major generals was given the assignment each day as “Major General of the Day.”This officer took on many of the Commander-in-Chief’s routine duties, which allowed General Washington to …

Life in the Rebel Camp

In 1775, military decorum and assigned duties within the ‘rebel’ units gradually improved from a collection of militia farmers and yeomen to the beginnings of a coordinated and effective fighting force.  Officers of the Continental Army, former merchants, planters, lawyers, farmers, and legislatures realized the need for organized camp life.  If a regiment learned to …

Guard Duty

In the words of American Revolutionary War Soldiers: “’Tis nothing – a private or two, now and then, Will not count in the news of the battle; Not an officer lost – only one of the men, Moaning out, all alone, the death rattle.”[1]   The lone sentry looks hard into the dark or night. …

George Washington’s Body Guard

George Washington’s Life Guard during the American Revolution              Throughout the American Revolutionary War, George Washington’s personal bodyguard was an elite corps of infantry and mounted men. It was officially entitled The Commander-in-Chief’s Guard, but was more commonly known as The Life Guard. At the start of the Revolutionary War, and the formation of the …

Washington’s New York City Headquarters – No. 1 Broadway

By the mid eighteenth century, New York City had grown to the extent that the wealthy sought country estates to escape the congestion of the “city”.  Another draw to build a ‘second home’ was the frequent outbreaks of diseases such as small pox, made worse in populated areas.   High society families such as Watts, Livingstone, …

Blacks in the Continental Army

Should Blacks Serve in the Continental Army? Washington and a new nation struggle with their convictions, morals, and necessity.    O’er the raging billows borne. Men, call’d Christians, bought & sold me, Paid my price in paltry gold; But though their’s they have enroll’d me, Minds are never to be sold.                                     by W. Cowper, …