Category «Armies»

America’s First African American Military Unit: Ethiopian Brigade in the American Revolution

The Ethiopian Brigade was the brainchild of John Murray, the 4th Earl of Dunmore, Royal Governor Lord Dunmore of Virginia. On November 7, 1775, he issued a proclamation that rattled the chains of slavery; that which fueled the economy of both the northern and southern thirteen rebellious British Colonies in North America.   Open warfare had …

British Army Command & Structure in the American Revolution – Grenadier & Light Infantry Battalions by Harry Schenawolf

Intro The French and Indian War in the North American Colonies (Seven Years War in Europe) posed unique circumstances that required the British officers who fought in America to consider changes in their tactics and army’s structure.  Gone were the windswept fields where large bodies of troops faced each other over open ground.  Skirmishes and …

Forgotten Warrior of the American Revolutionary War, Brigadier General John Nixon

Brave, Humble, Firm, Dedicated There are two Revolutionary War soldiers of merit who share the same name. Colonel John Nixon of Pennsylvania and Brigadier General John Nixon of Massachusetts. Colonel Nixon of Pennsylvania has received far more attention than General Nixon. Colonel Nixon, along with his father Richard, were shipbuilders and prominent citizens of Philadelphia …

American Revolutionary War Forces Chain of Command at the Start of the 1776 New York City Campaign

When the British abandoned Boston, George Washington and his generals knew King George was far from listening to the colonist’s demands. They would be back, and in force. But where? All information and common sense pointed to New York City. Though smaller in size than Philadelphia and not the center of the fledgling rebel government, …

British General Sir Henry Clinton, General William Howe’s Opinionated Second in Command During the American Revolutionary War

It is common knowledge that the Ministerial Forces of King George the Third stationed in America during the War of Independence were as much absorbed in quarreling with one another as in fighting the rebel army, not due to differences over strategy, but because of personal friction. Simply put,  there was little, if any cooperation …